Saturday, July 13, 2013

Culpret's Caught

Every year I have to do battle with the neighbourhood Bushy Tailed Woodrat (Packrat). Some years, it's more than one. Some years, like this one, it's both spring and fall. The first hint that Ms. Woodrat has arrived is "harvesting" displayed in piles on the cabin deck. The second hint is flowers and vegetables nibbled right down to the dirt, not a pretty sight.

Several seasons ago, we purchased a Havahart 0745 live trap for squirrels, rats and chipmunks at Rainbow Valley Pet and Farm Supplies. Wayne loaded it up with peanut butter as bait. By the second night, we had success. Bye-bye Ms. Woodrat.

The Woodrat is the only rat native to Canada. It eats leaves and seeds (and flowers and garden veggies). They live on cliffs (we've got a big one of those), and in abandoned buildings (our shed isn't abandoned but it's pretty quiet). A Woodrat is a large, gentle, squirrel-like rodent with soft grey and light brown fur. Its large eyes and ears, and bushy tail make it easy to identify. In addition to storing food, Woodrats are notorious for taking and hiding bright shiny objects.


Wayne took Ms. Woodrat for a ride in our tin boat to distant Goat Island to start a new life. There's plenty of cliffs, food, and shelter for her there. And with her gone, maybe my flowers and veggies on the deck will have a chance to recover. -- Margy

8 comments:

  1. Not at all ugly like most regular rats. I have been battling bugs. They ate all my dill and basil and some of my flowers. Nasty buggers

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  2. Oh, dear, your poor garden. She does look like a rather sweet and gentle creature, so I'm glad Wayne took her to Goat Island. I hope she doesn't swim "home" to your place.
    K

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  3. Good to know the woodrat was caught and taken to a new home.

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  4. She does look rather sweet! How funny that we have both posted about rats xxx

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  5. Here's hoping for more flowers and veggies. MB

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  6. It's great that you can relocate your intruder across the water. We also use a Havahart to capture mice but we relocate them up the mountain...I always wonder if they return or do in fact start a new life elsewhere. Ms. Woodrat is so big, I'm glad we just have little mice!

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  7. Thanks all for stopping by to comment. Looks like she was a single gal, now all we have to do is contend with the mice who have set up one on the garden float. So far, three caught, one (or more I am afraid) are at large. Wayne says it is a losing battle. - Margy

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  8. I have so many that love my gardens!!!!

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