Thursday, May 03, 2018

Float Cabin Living: What happens during storms?

We love to be at our float cabin home in all seasons, so we're there for all types of weather. We are relatively safe in Hole in the Wall. The bay, promontory and nearby Goat Island protect us from the worst winds. On the open lake, especially in the area dubbed the “North Sea” just beyond First Narrows, storm winds out of the southeast can whip the water into three foot plus waves.



After storms pass, clearing northwest winds blast down First Narrows creating dangerous waves. I’ve even seen hefty workboats duck into Hole in the Wall for a brief respite. Traveling on the lake in our Hewescraft would be more dangerous than staying put.


The worst damage we've experienced is a dislodged chimney, broken anchor cables (Up the Lake Chapter 4), and a rust weakened BBQ that flew the coop leaving its legs sticking up like a dead bug. That’s not bad. Several cabins have been severely damaged.


The weight of snow on the float could be a problem. Fortunately Powell Lake’s weather is moderated by the nearby ocean. Snow typically sticks only a few days. The biggest problem we have is uncovering solar panels so we can continue to gather the limited winter sun.

Rain is the most common type of storm. If you live in a floating cabin, a little more water isn’t a problem. Thin cracks between the boards on the deck let the water run right through.



The cabin rides easily up and down on its anchor cables as the lake rises and falls from wet to dry seasons.

Additional weather videos you might enjoy include:

A Snowy Day at Hole in the Wall
Windstorm Waterspouts
Mother Nature Blowing Bubbles

So, let it storm and let it rain. We’re prepared. Are you? -- Margy

12 comments:

  1. Very interesting post, Margy. Thanks for the info and cools shots
    MB

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    1. You are welcome. We had a strong clearing wind last night and the stars were amazing. - Margy

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  2. What a wonderful lifestyle you have! Love that shot over the bow of the boat. Gorgeous clouds and sky.

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    1. It's a great boat for a large lake that can get large waves. - Margy

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  3. Yours is an adventurous life, Margy. Cheers!

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    1. Sometimes it feels that way, others it feels quite normal. - Margy

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  4. Great videos especially of the "North Sea".
    Does the deck around the cabin ever get slippery? From here in the sub-tropics it is hard to imagine snow at sea level - or rather lake level

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    1. Before we put stain on our decks they got slippery with black mold in the winter. Now it only gets slippery if there is frost or ice, which isn't very often. You have to be careful about shady spots next to the boats. They can be deceptively slippery. - Margy

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  5. I enjoyed your photos and your videos. Oh my that rain is really hammering the ocean in one video. It sounds like your cabin is perfectly situated from the worst of the elements.

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    1. We are actually on a lake, a very large lake. We only call the big open spot the "North Sea" because of the waves it can get. - Margy

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  6. I admire your lifestyle so much - but I couldn't do it .... thanks for letting us peek inside the day to day workings when you have storms ... and the beauty you enjoy when they pass!

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    1. It really isn't all that hard. The main difference is we are away from town and lots of people. - Margy

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