Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Stihl Chainsaw Maintenance

This time of year we use our chainsaw a lot. We are gathering wood to store for winter use in our Kozi woodstove.  Some wood we gather from the lake is a burnable kindling size, but to get larger chunks we need to cut small logs for splitting.

Lately, Wayne's saw has been hard to start and struggles when cutting even smaller logs. So he got out the manual for our Stihl chainsaw and broke it down to give it some good maintenance. Over the years, our good friend John has done this for us. But Wayne has learned a lot from him to become more self sufficient.

It was a bit scary to see all those parts on the picnic table. For one thing, a small nut or other part could roll off and fall through the cracks to the lake water below. The other thought was, would it all go back together and run.  But all went well, and we were back to our wood gathering project in no time. -- Margy

14 comments:

  1. That would be worrying for me too, if you lost a nut or bolt. Seems lots of work to keep warm. I like the shot of the red boat with the logs in the boat.

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  2. Definitely not the time of year to be diving off your float to find pieces of chain saw. Might have been marginally less scary to have him do it inside on a large piece of plastic or an old blanket.
    I love the first photo, and have fond memories of cutting up firewood as a teenager in the BC interior.
    Have you seen the Stihl commercials on TV? No two people pronounce it the same way and it's quite cute.
    Stay warm!
    K

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  3. Stephanie - We spread the work out over late summer and early fall so it doesn't seem so bad. To me, a full woodshed feels like a bank account full of money.

    Kay - Probably would have been a good idea to put something down first. Hindsight is always better, but fortunately nothing landed below the table.

    Margy

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  4. I have a Stihl chainsaw but have never taken it apart like that. I'm impressed.

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  5. beautiful part of the world you live in. I have to say chainsaws do scare me a bit but I'm sure once I was shown how to use it correctly i would be good to go.

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  6. This is perfect. I miss the coast so much, I grew up on Vancouver Island. (a thousand years ago - lol)

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  7. Nice photos, and as long as that chainsaw got put back altogether, with no stray parts on your table, I think you are good to go!

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  8. We lived for a few years when I was a teenager in the White Mountains of Arizona. We heated the house with a fireplace that had heat exchangers and blowers. It was a constant chore all year hauling, cutting, splitting, and stacking wood.

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  9. Good post and shots. I've never been much use with a chainsaw.

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  10. Great to have the saw working again and wood for the winter! We got the red crock pot came from Target. We have several from very small to large. Marianne has one that's over 30 years old that is still her favorite.

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  11. Am glad I can leave that up to hubby. I would be able to take it apart, but putting together? That would be a big question! Thanks for visiting me at my wordpress blog!

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  12. It certainly is best if you learn how to keep your tools in ship shape order. My grandson maintains both the tractor and chainsaws and since he has taken over, they all work perfectly.
    Good luck with your gathering, cutting and chopping.

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  13. It certainly is best if you learn how to keep your tools in ship shape order. My grandson maintains both the tractor and chainsaws and since he has taken over, they all work perfectly.
    Good luck with your gathering, cutting and chopping.

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  14. Thanks everyone for stopping by and commenting on my post. Now we are enjoying the fruits of our labour. But we still have a raft full to cut and split on the next sunny day. - Margy

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