Saturday, September 08, 2012

Better Late Than Never

Usually we have Barn Swallows nesting above our front porch under the peak of the roof. This year, we had no early season nest takers. We were afraid that our annual pair was either too old to return, or met an untimely death on their long migration from South America. Finally, in mid-August, we noticed the nest had been rebuilt.

Then we saw a female bird sitting on eggs. Now there are at least two chicks and both parents are busy bringing them tasty bugs as they rapidly grow to fledgling size. I'll miss the first flight this year, but I'm sure all will go well. Maybe our new pair will start returning each year now that they know the nest is available. I hope so. -- Margy

9 comments:

  1. Good to hear your barn swallows did return and nest.

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  2. Funny that. We know the robins had a couple of nests. Our Phoebe did not. It was such an early spring.
    Love to see them!
    Cheers from Cottage Country!

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  3. It's often the case that late-started birds haven't grown enough to develop the strength for the migration south, and mortality is high. Early birds have a better chance.

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  4. Interesting post - I enjoyed and learned a lot from the links you shared. I'm glad the pair returned - hopefully they will continue for more years, it must be pretty exciting to wait for their arrival.

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  5. We experienced the same with the robins that usually occupy our back porch, they came late this year as well. Visiting from Camera Critters.

    Green Bug
    Have a great weekend.

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  6. Hope they make it to fly south in time.

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  7. This is so wonderful, MArgy! We had a stray cat who comes over to deliver her kittens in the terrace...

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  8. Wonderful that birds return to a home like this! And how marvellous to be able to watch their daily life!

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  9. Paul - Our nesting pair usually has two broods. But you are right, having a few weeks to fly and eat on their own, the first fledglings must be much more prepared for the long trip. These babies will barely be flying before they have to leave. - Margy

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