Monday, January 04, 2010

Remnant Population by Elizabeth Moon

What does an author buy as Christmas presents? Books of course. In my stocking I found Remnant Population by Elizabeth Moon. She is one of Wayne's favourite science fiction writers. He purchased it earlier in the year for his Kindle, but couldn't share it with me because I don't have one yet.

Elizabeth Moon is from Texas. Her educational background is in history and biology (just like me) and she served as a Marine (definitely not like me).

Remnant Population isn't your normal (if there is such a thing) science fiction novel. It is set in Sims Bancorp Colony 3245.12 on a distant earth-like planet. Over the last forty years, the colony has terraformed their surroundings, but it hasn't been easy. Now, representatives from company headquarters have arrived to tell them they all must leave. With stoic resignation, the colonists prepare their belongings and ready themselves for a long interstellar trip in cryogenic suspension. Everyone except for grandmotherly Ofelia. She has always followed the demands of her parents, husband, employer and most recently her son, but not this time. She decides to stay behind and live as she wishes, alone but not lonely.

Trained as a self-sufficient colonist, she is able to use and maintain the buildings, materials and equipment needed to sustain herself. She's an avid gardener and lives simply until new colonists arrive far to the north. As she listens to their landing transmissions, they are horribly massacred. Ofelia knows this will be the end of her solitary life. Intelligent and deadly creatures share her planet, and her own kind won't let the tragedy go unavenged.

Even though the book is set far in the future on a distant planet, life in the colony was much like living in a small rural community. I could see lots of similarities to my lifestyle and attitudes living off the grid. Ofelia decided late in life that she would live according to her own plan. She no longer cared what others thought and finally was comfortable speaking her own mind. She became quite a role model for me in more ways than one.

Check your local bookstore, library or online book source for Remnant Population. I couldn't put it down except when my flashlight ran dim late at night. -- Margy

7 comments:

  1. That sounds like another good book.I will have to check it out.
    ~~Hugs~~

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  2. http://mynewenglandlife.blogspot.com/2010/01/sim-farm.html
    I don't know if this will work or not but the post has picture of a place called Sim's Farm.I thought that was funny because of the name of the Colny in your book.
    ~~Hugs~~

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  3. Hi Betty - In fact I pictured something like that in my mind as I was reading, with the forest at the edge of the tended fields. I will bring the book back and give it to you to read. I thought you might like it, especially the character Ofelia. She makes me think about people like us. - Margy

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  4. The lady Ofelia certainly made an impression on you, Margy...I'm going to have to find the book. What could be better...sci-fi and an older lady who speaks her mind?

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  5. I'm not much of SciFi fan but I will check this one out. Last one I remember reading/buying was Stanislaw Lem's Hospital of Transfiguration when it came out, I think. That was a long time ago.

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  6. Sounds like a very interesting read. I am ready for another good book - I just finished "One Second After" by William Forstchen. Makes me glad we live where we do and have the interests we do. But we hope never to experience anything like what happens in the book...

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  7. It’s great to see good information being shared and also to see fresh, creative ideas that have never been done before.

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