Wednesday, October 17, 2018

3 Kindle Ebooks FREE from October 22-28

As a special thank you to all of our blog readers, here are three Kindle ebooks just for you.

Pick one or all, they're FREE
from October 22-28

and you don't have to own a Kindle to enjoy them. Just get a free Kindle app for your smartphone, pad or computer. 

Check here if you need a free Kindle App.



Flying the 
Pacific Northwest

Description: Airports of Western Washington and Oregon form the backdrop for adventures in the Pacific Northwest. Take the controls of a Piper Arrow, as your personal flight instructor leads you to out-of-the-way spots. For armchair pilots and experienced pros, this book is an escape so realistic you’ll swear you’re airborne.

Click here for your FREE copy of Flying the Pacific Northwest.




Up the Inlet

Description: Come boating up the inlets of coastal British Columbia, where the mountains drop into the sea, and lifestyles focus on self-assurance and a different sense of purpose. Follow along as we cruise northward from the Strait of Georgia, to Cortes and Quadra Islands, and beyond.

Click here for your FREE copy of Up the Inlet.




http://www.amazon.com/Across-Galactic-Sea-Wayne-Lutz-ebook/dp/B00AR6AOLCAcross the Galactic Sea

Description: Spaceship Challenger is on mankind’s first galactic voyage using a high-tech blend of space jumps and cryogenic hibernation. Captain Tina Brett leads her ship towards the ultimate goal, first contact with alien intelligence, until a navigational glitch changes everything. Then there's a mutiny, or is it something more? Six individuals on an epic journey for the good of mankind.

Click here for your
FREE copy of Across the Galactic Sea


Happy reading from Wayne and Margy
www.PowellRiverBooks.com

Tuesday, October 09, 2018

Overnight Trip to the Head of Powell Lake

We woke up Monday with a workboat neighbour.
Our ocean-going 24' Bayliner spends the winter in Powell Lake's fresh water to keep it clear of marine growth. It's good for the boat and us. We get to use it for mini lake cruises.

In late September we found two good weather days in a row, so we loaded up for an overnight trip to the Head of Powell Lake.

A typical Powell Lake waterfall.
We were amazed at the number of waterfalls and the huge amount of water cascading into the lake. Many of the falls had long drops down sheer rock faces.

We went on a weekend so we could tie up to the logging dock. When we arrived we were the only boat and relished the privacy.

This is a busy logging area, sometimes even on weekends.



On the bridge over the Powell River.
We tied up and walked to the bridge where the Powell River enters the head of the lake. It's the single largest water source. The swollen river crashed down its rock chute to the lake surface. The last time we were here it was summer dry with low lake levels.

On the way we passed an active logging area. I love looking at the big equipment. Several years ago I got to go on one of Western Forest Products' forest tours. Click here to see a harvester in action.


Logs processed and stacked ready for extraction.

At the log sort near the dock there was one logging truck waiting to bring the logs from the work site to the skid where they will be dumped into Powell Lake. Click here for a video of one in action.

A "fat truck" used only on logging roads for log hauling.

Here's a video of a log dump here at the Head.


We ate dinner on the boat's back deck and the night was calm and good for sleeping.

Leaving the Head of Powell Lake for our float cabin home.

Do you do fall or winter cruising? What are some of your stories?

Thanks for visiting part of my world this week. For more great posts from Our World Tuesday, click here.

And also a meme called Through My Lens by Mersad.

And Tuesdays with a Twist at Stone Cottage Adventures. -- Margy

Monday, October 01, 2018

Harvesting and Storing Potatoes

Potatoes growing in a barrel.
Each year I grow potatoes in barrels. I get enough from three barrels for Wayne and I to enjoy through the winter. I've found that Yukon Golds make a nice sized spud that stays firm and fresh when stored for months. Any that do sprout by spring I use for seed potatoes. The barrel on the left is ready to dig because the plants have died back. The one on the right isn't ready yet.

Each barrel gave me a bucket of potatoes.
Last week I dug up four barrels worth to store for winter use. First I let the soil in the barrels dry. I find digging the potatoes out with my hand is easiest on me and the potatoes. Eliminating cuts from sharp objects helps the potatoes store better. To help keep my digging hand and nails cleaner, I wear a latex glove.

Saving soil from potato barrels.
As I dig, I remove the dirt to get to potatoes at the bottom. I save the soil for next year's gardening for anything except potatoes and tomatoes. This year I added the soil to my raised beds in the float garden. Using my own seed potatoes and saving soil reduces my overall gardening costs.

Dry potatoes before storage.
Here's my bounty from one barrel. I left them out to dry and to allow the skin to firm up. It's best not to wash potatoes before storage. Just brush off any excess dirt and then inspect them for damage. Damaged spuds should be eaten as soon as possible. They do not store well and may damage your good produce.

Wrapping potatoes in newspaper for storage.
Store potatoes away from light and in temperatures between 5 and 10°C. If it's too cold, starch will turn to sugar and make them sweet. Paper and burlap bags or cardboard boxes are good for storage. Do not use plastic bags. Trapped moisture will accelerate spoilage. Avoid storing potatoes with apples, onions or garlic. They produce a gas that causes potatoes to spoil quickly. If potatoes are exposed to the light they will turn green. Remove green portions before eating.

Store in a cool location.
I wrap my potatoes in newspaper and store them is open sided plastic baskets ($1.00 each at the Dollar Store). This keeps them away from the light and separates them from neighboring potatoes. The paper allows the potatoes to "breathe" but also prevents too much moisture from escaping.

Pouch potatoes ready to cook in the woodstove.
I keep the baskets under the downstairs bed, the coolest place in the cabin. Properly stored potatoes will remain dormant and will not sprout for about three months after harvesting. That makes for lots of comfort food meals throughout winter. -- Margy