Saturday, August 06, 2016

Coastal BC Reptiles: Pacific Chorus Frog

 Pacific Chorus Frog

We have lots of critters up at our float cabin on Powell Lake. Most of them are annual returnees, but this year I saw my first Pacific Chorus Frog (Pseudacris regilla). I went to water my zucchini plant and there he was, sunning himself on one of the large leaves.
A Pacific Chorus Frog on a matching zucchini leaf.

The Pacific Chorus Frog is common in Southern BC west of the Rockies and on Vancouver Island. It can be found in the woods, meadows, and even in urban areas. They come in light grey, tan, bronze or bright emerald green. You can see which kind I found.

This colour is great for camouflage on summer plants.

They are small frogs, up to 5 centimetres in length. A distinguishing mark is the mask-like stripe that starts at the nostrils and continues all the way to the shoulder.

This view shows the sticky toe pads on their feet to assist in climbing.

Pacific Chorus Frogs breed mostly in temporary water bodies that dry up later in the summer months. This prevents enemies such as fish and bullfrogs from raiding their eggs and young. Powell Lake has a good sized population of invasive bullfrogs, garter snakes and trout, so breeding here must be a challenge.

Mating season comes in the spring. Next year I'll have to listen more carefully for their krek-ek song. -- Margy

Reference: B.C. Frogwatch Program (online)

12 comments:

  1. Beautiful frog, and I love the soothing greens in your photos.

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    1. Maybe the matching colour attracted him. - Margy

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  2. Great little frog to have seen and photographed. We are heading to Victoria at the beginning of September for a visit with our family there.

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    1. We should still have some nice weather here for you. - Margy

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  3. Mom had one that lived in her hanging plant at the last house - so cool. I couldn't figure out how he got in it (6 feet up) until I saw his suction cups on his little feet.

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    1. Aren't they cute, and so functional for a tree dweller. - Margy

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  4. What a neat little frog. I tell them by their calls a lot more often than seeing tham.

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    1. The funny thing is that we rarely hear frogs near the cabin. The ones we do I think are mostly bullfrogs. - Margy

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  5. Beautiful little Frog. I believe we have them here too. I occasionally see them here I just have called them green Tree Frogs. Maybe not--I will look for the stripe. thanks.
    MB

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    1. I think they go by both names. I found this identification online. - Margy

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  6. Great capture. Thanks for the info. I love the name.

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    1. I hope to hear his someday soon. - Margy

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