Saturday, June 13, 2015

"Becoming Wild" by Nikki Van Schyndel

http://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Wild-Living-Primitive-Island-ebook/dp/B00NQDK6RU/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-1&qid=1433016598
When I first heard about Becoming Wild by Nikki Van Schyndel (Caitlin Press, 2014), I knew it would be a book I would enjoy. It's a memoir, it's by a woman who challenged herself to live in a remote location, it's about a region fairly close to where I live in Coastal British Columbia, and it includes detailed descriptions of "experiments" and "learnings from Coastal First Nations people" that she used to survive off the grid.

Becoming Wild is available in both print and e-book formats. When I saw it at Village Books in Bellingham while Wayne and I were attending a Whatcom Community College class on independent publishing (we learned that's the "new" term for self publishing), I knew I wanted the print version to save for my personal library about British Columbia.

Nikki, Micah (a man she met during survival school), and her feral cat Scout planned and lived a survivalist lifestyle that spanned two island locations and more than a year in the rainforest coast of the Broughton Archipelago. When the trailer at Native Anchorage on Village Island didn't turn out to be liveable, they erected their own primitive shelter. Life that first winter was a struggle just to find enough food.

Nikki and Micah had a rowboat they used for transportation, fishing, and to get to Echo Bay on Gilford Island one every month or two to get mail and reconnect with family by phone. After meeting Billy Proctor, a well know resident, they took his suggestion and left Native Anchorage to set up a rustic cabin structure in Booker Lagoon on Broughton Island. Life wasn't easy, but Nikki was able absorb the natural spirituality of the land and sea, ultimately transforming herself into a better person.

When the adventure was done, Nikki and Micah parted ways. Nikki and Scout returned to the city, but life there was so foreign after living in nature. She returned to Echo Bay, bought property from Billy Proctor and built a log cabin of her own.

Billy Proctor is a prominent figure in many of the books written about the region.

Full Moon, Flood Tide by Bill Proctor and Yvonne Maximchuk
Drawn to Sea by Yvonne Maximchuk
Heart of the Raincoast by Alexandra Morton and Bill Proctor
Tide Rips and Back Eddies by Bill Proctor and Yvonne Maximchuk

Do you have any books to recommend? I'm always looking for a good read. -- Margy

9 comments:

  1. Grizzlies in Their Backyard by Beth Day is one that I enjoyed about a couple in 1919 that went up Knight Inlet and lived there for years, hunting and trapping and raising orphan bear cubs.

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    1. I read that book several years ago. I loved it too. I learned a lot about saving eggs without refrigeration from that book, plus a whole lot more about life up the coast in the early years. - Margy

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  2. This book sounds perfect for your BC library It will be interesting reading.

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    1. It has really grown over the years. They are the only books I save except for the ones in the Kindle library of course. - Margy

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    1. That was from our trip last summer to get to the Broughtons. We didn't make it through Johnstone Strait with the wind and waves, maybe another time we'll get to see the area where Nikki had her adventure. - Margy

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  4. I have so many books to read!

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    1. Sounds like you do lots of reading for reviews in addition to pleasure reading. - Margy

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  5. Sounds like an interesting book. I will look for it.
    M

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