Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Float Cabin Deck Replacement Part 2

Cedar boards heading up the lake.
This is the second post about replacing the cedar deck at our float cabin. In the previous post, I gave you a little history about how our good friend John built our cabin's foundation and deck.

If you missed it, scroll down to the next post.


The Hewescraft is a great work boat.
John did the whole project for us. He arranged for old growth cedar boards to be cut to specification. The largest load went up on our barge.

Extras went up on our Hewescraft. Both of these are great work boats.


To give John the time and space needed to work, we coordinated it with our Snowbird RV Adventure to the States.

John repaired the foundation pony walls before replacing the deck boards.

John replaced the cabin's deck a section at a time. Work went from October through December. We were able to get up to the cabin during construction to check on things and enjoy our off-the-grid home.

The cabin front deck, half old and half new. Can you see the difference?

Here are the results. I love the look and smell of fresh cedar lumber.

The side deck and boat dock looking towards Goat Island .

The rear side deck and dock. John added a bull rail to secure our boats with ropes.

The side and front deck.

The front deck looking towards the transition float to shore.

Waste not, want not. John cut up the old deck boards to become future firewood. What wouldn't fit into the floating woodshed remains on our cedar log work float.

Cut up deck boards stored on our cedar log work float.

Old deck boards cut up and stored in our floating wood shed.

Now we are set for another 22 years at the least. Who knows how long we can live up the lake, but if we are able, the sturdy deck and foundation repairs will support us. -- Margy


Thanks for visiting part of my world this week. For more great posts from Our World Tuesday, click here.

Also posting to a meme called Through My Lens by Mersad.

Visit Tuesdays with a Twist at Stone Cottage Adventures.

Hop on over to the Simple Life Mom and see some great ideas for homesteading and simple living.

19 comments:

  1. That is beautiful!

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  2. What an epic project!

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    1. It really was. And it was good we were on the road while John was working. The few times we got up to the cabin it was hard to get around safely with wet and slippery uneven wood surfaces. - Margy

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    1. I enjoyed looking at your ranch photographs. I've always loved horses and even though I was raised in the city I was fortunate enough to have four in my lifetime. - Margy

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  4. I hope you do get to live there another 22 years, what a wonderful place - and beautiful deck.

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    1. We will stay as long as our health and abilities make it possible. - Margy

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  5. That's pretty amazing. First that you have such a remote place to live away from it all, and second your new deck is very nice. I love how they cut up and saved the old boards for use as firewood.
    Back in the day, growing up in the White Mountains of Arizona there was a sawmill that discarded their end pieces of boards in a big pile. Everybody in town, including us took pickups up there to gather them up for firewood.

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    1. Firewood is so important to keep us warm in the winter. The deck boards burn fast and hot and that helps keep creosote out of the chimney pipes. - Margy

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  6. Wow! What a beautiful area/view from your home. And great work he did!!

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    1. We love that view in all seasons. Growing up in Los Angeles without district seasons heightened my appreciation I’m sure. - Margy

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  7. My, you are in a glorious place!
    It looks wonderful there. Besides being beautiful wood, the cedar will definitely last awhile too.

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    1. And because it’s old growth cedar it should last longer than our first deck from second growth wood. - Margy

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  8. Margy - what a difference! You are so blessed to have a professional that is a friend and a talented builder! Here's to the next 22 years!

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    1. We always say that when we bought the cabin, John came with it. We couldn’t have gotten a better deal. - Margy

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  9. John is a craftsperson extraordinary and that’s beautiful lumber and I can well believe it will last that long!

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    1. He learned everything from his high school shop class, his father and personal experience. He is great about asking advice and now even uses the Internet a bit. He's not very techie but Googles topics and finds bargains online. - Margy

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  10. What a beautiful project that, I'm sure, will last a long time!


    Feel free to share at My Corner of the World

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We welcome your comments and questions. - Wayne and Margy