Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Edgehill Hauling and Towing on Powell Lake, BC

Logging dock quad barge campsite.
Our float cabin home on Powell Lake faces First Narrows. This gives us prime viewing for tugs with barges that supply logging companies with materials and equipment, and haul booms of logs to the extraction point at the south end of the lake.

River Yarder tug and barge approaching the ramp at the Head.

On our recent trip to the head of Powell Lake with our good friends Dave and Marg, we got to watch Terry in his green and black tug called River Yarder off-load at the barge ramp. This time his wife Jane had enough time off from work at Quality Foods to take the five and a half hour journey (each way) plus wait time.

Approaching the barge ramp.

We watched from our campsite on the logging dock as Terry expertly maneuvered the flatbed barge into place and lowered the ramp for the vehicles to exit. This trip he was resupplying the helicopter base with a fuel tanker and a large truck with rotor parts to repair the Kamov Ka-32 helicopter in use for heli-logging.

Driving the helicopter part supply truck off the barge.

Usually Terry can quickly off-load, pick up a new load, and be on his way. This time he had to wait several hours while the helicopter repairs were finished before the semi-truck could get back on the barge.

Getting a boost from the skip loader, fuel truck waiting its turn.

Since we needed the same barge ramp to load our quads for our trip south, we used the extra time to ride to the waterfall on Cypress main. Looks more like January rather than August doesn't it.

Margy, Marg (with Crystal) and Dave on Cypress Main.
The helicopter got its repairs done, Terry and Jane reloaded the vehicles and headed down the lake, and we followed right behind. The River Yarder is such a powerful tug that we never caught up even with our smaller self-propelled barge. -- Margy

19 comments:

  1. Now that I see your photos, I have seen that little tug tied up at the Shingle Mill, but for sure never pushing a barge like here.

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    1. Even with the big tugs it's amazing that they can move such large loads. Guess it's a lesson in momentum. - Margy

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  2. We always admire the barges we see on the Columbia ...have watched grain loading a couple of times. Those captains have to be very skilled.

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    1. The Columbia is such a huge river and is deep enough to travel by large ship quite a ways up. Barges with their shallow draft can go even farther. - Margy

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  3. That's a long trip back and forth! I can't imagine doing that job and moving big trucks around!

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    1. It's almost like a ferry but with the engine separate. That's pretty much what tugs are, a huge engine in a small body. - Margy

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  4. Exceptionally interesting. I watch barges here on the Gulf, but really never realized what work can be done with them.

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    1. We have a gulf too on the ocean side, but it is long and skinny and not a huge as yours. - Margy

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  5. I love the area where you live.

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    1. Thanks. We thought the same thing when we came here on vacation and decided to stay. - Margy

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  6. Wow very interesting---what a fun life you guys have.
    The pickles look good.
    MB

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    1. They were/are. Just wished my crop had been bigger to make more. - Margy

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  7. Interesting barge and tug - that is some heavy equipment to be hauling around. It is always amazing to watch the skill of the mighty outdoors workers. We've seen the coal barges - hundreds and hundreds of them - moored alongside the riverbanks and going up and down the Ohio River - another amazing sight.

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    1. I bet they did a lot in Alaska as well. - Margy

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  8. The lake is gorgeous! Nice photos ♥

    summerdaisycottage.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks. It took our hearts away when we first saw it. - Margy

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  9. How interesting! Thanks so much for visiting!
    Hugs,
    Debbie

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    1. I wish I discovered Powell River years ago. There is so much history here. - Margy

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  10. You sure have a blast!

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