Monday, March 19, 2018

Coastal BC Birds: Oregon Junco

Oregon Junco

One bird that arrives in spring at our float cabin on Powell Lake is the Oregon Junco, a regional variation of the Dark-eyed Junco.  They are a member of the sparrow family with a distinctive dark hooded head and brownish bodies. A sturdy beak is well suited for seed eating.

An Oregon Junco on our granite cliff.

Oregon Juncos are common in the western United States and British Columbia. They live in the understory of coniferous forests. In winter they move to open areas including fields and lawns in town.

An Oregon Junco fledgling on our bridge to shore.

Oregon Juncos typically have two broods a year. Juncos build ground-based nests in protected areas. Each brood has from three to five chicks that hatch in about twelve days and fledge about twelve days later.

Mother Junco feeds one of her fledglings a seed.

For the last two years, a pair of Juncos has raised their family on our granite cliff. The female brought her young chicks to the seed feeders on our bridge to shore. It was also fun to watch young birds playing in the water in the shallows nearby.

Two fledglings taking a bath in the shallows on shore.

One year a large flock of Oregon Juncos arrived at the same time. It was the same week that I planted seeds in my float garden.

Wayne with our protective garden netting.
Wayne and I raced to cover the beds with bird netting to protect my crops. Even so, some got through and we had to help them get out. After the fact we termed this the Junco Wars. You can read that story by clicking here.


Thanks for visiting my post this week. I'm linking up with Camera Critters and Saturday's Critters. Check them out for more great animal pictures. -- Margy

14 comments:

  1. Great shot of Momma bird feeding the baby! I mostly get those at my feeder, they seem to like the thistle that I mix in which is supposed to attract finches

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    1. When they aren't attacking my garden I enjoy having them around. - Margy

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  2. Great new visitors! I am having my share! :-)

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    1. I do enjoy having the birds return in spring. It always seems so quiet in winter. - Margy

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  3. Hello, The Oregon Juncos are pretty. Wonderful photos of your visitors. It was a good idea to cover your crops. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. I also appreciate your visit and comment. Happy Sunday, enjoy your new week ahead!

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    1. That was the only year we had to do it for Juncos. Last year we had to do it for Canada Geese eating my sprouting lettuce. That was even more annoying. - Margy

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  4. I had a feeder on the balcony for a while, but the Junco mess meant it wasn't up long!

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    1. Last year we only had a few and the one who raised a brood in the bushes on our cliff. - Margy

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  5. Great photos of the Oregon Juncos!
    Have a wonderful week!

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    1. Thanks. I enjoy them as long as they aren't in my garden. - Margy

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  6. You birds make me homesick. We used to have those in our Oregon yards (not surprisingly)....but not in those great numbers. Probably because our garden wasn't as inviting as yours!

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    1. I have forgiven them for the one garden raid. I do enjoy their company. - Margy

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  7. I have seen a few of these in my yard this morning!!! And it is quite possible that some of the nests we have seen on the ground on our hikes are those of Oregon Juncos. Have a wonderful week!

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    1. Lucky you. I have yet to find a nest, but the bushes on our cliff are very dense. - Margy

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